additive manufacturing in the oil and gas

The Market for Additive Manufacturing in the Oil and Gas Sector 2018-2029

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Table of Contents

Chapter One: Evolution of the Opportunities for Adoption of Additive Manufacturing Technology in the Oil and Gas Industry

1.1 Unique Oil and Gas Industry Dynamics Affecting Adoption of AM
1.1.1 Opportunities for AM to Enter the Oil and Gas Supply Chain
1.1.2 The Need to Ensure Reliability of Oil and Gas Parts and AM Processes
1.2 Outlook for the Oil and Gas Industry in 2019 and How it Reflects on CapEx Investments for AM
1.2.1 Oil and Gas Companies Are Ready to Spend
1.2.2 Keeping the Supply Chain Optimized with New Technologies
1.2.3 Decarbonization and Digitalization
1.2.4 Pressure on the Supply Chain
1.3 Relevant Adopting Segment in the Oil and Gas Industry
1.4 Additive Manufacturing Technologies for the Oil and Gas Industry
1.5 Key Benefits of AM for Oil and Gas
1.6 Adoption Model for AM in Oil and Gas
1.7 Ten-year Forecast of Overall Market Opportunity for AM in Oil and Gas
1.8 Forecast Methodology
1.9 Key Points from This Chapter

Chapter Two: Analyzing the AM Technologies and Materials Driving Innovation in the Oil and Gas Industry

2.1 Overview of AM Hardware Adoption by the Oil and Gas Industry
2.1.1 AM Technologies for the Oil and Gas Industry Considered in This Report
2.1.1.1 Other AM Technologies That Could Become Relevant Long Term
2.1.2.2 Tool-less manufacturing
2.1.3 Ten-year Forecast for All AM Hardware in Oil and Gas
2.2 Latest Evolutions of Metal AM Technologies Used in Oil and Gas
2.2.1 Latest Evolutionary Trends in Metal AM Hardware Technologies for Oil and Gas Applications
2.2.1.1 Powder Bed Fusion Retains Leadership
2.2.1.2 Fast Growth of DED for Large Format Applications
2.2.1.3 Will New Metal Binder Jetting Technologies Prove to Be Fit for Production Applications in Oil and Gas?
2.2.2 Transitional AM Technologies
2.2.2.1 Bound metal filament deposition desktop systems emerging as a viable studio prototyping solution for metal devices
2.2.2.2 Sand-based binder jetting for casting
2.2.2.3 Tracking the Emergence of Supersonic Consolidation Processes
2.2.3 Ten-year Forecast for Metal AM Hardware in Oil and Gas
2.2.3.1 Ten-year Forecast for Metal AM Hardware in Oil and Gas
2.3 Polymer and Composite AM Technologies Used in Oil and Gas
2.3.1 Latest Evolutionary Trends in Polymer AM Hardware Technologies for Oil and Gas Applications
2.3.1.1 Polymer Powder Bed Fusion Could Become the Largest Hardware Opportunity Through Material Development
2.3.1.2 Photopolymerization Evolves in Three Directions: Layerless, Industrial (+Casting) and Desktop Prototyping
2.3.1.3 Different Applications for Pellet- and Filament-based Material Extrusion Technologies
2.3.2 Ten-year Forecast for Polymer AM Hardware in Oil and Gas
2.4 Overview of Materials Used for AM in the Oil and Gas Industry
2.4.1 Material Development to Enable Additive Manufacturing in Oil and Gas
2.4.2 Ten-year Forecast for All Materials in Oil and Gas AM
2.5 Metal Materials for Oil and Gas AM
2.5.1 Steel and Steel Alloys
2.5.2 Nickel Alloys
2.5.3 Cobalt Chromium
2.5.4 Titanium
2.5.5 Other Metals (Refractories, Tungsten Carbide, Tantalum, Molybdenum, Niobium)
2.5.6 Ten-year Forecast for All Metal Materials in Oil and Gas AM
2.5.7 Nickel Superalloys Emerging as Key Materials in Oil and Gas AM
2.5.8 High Titanium Demand for Wire DED Processes in Oil and Gas Applications
2.5.8.1 Ten-year Forecast of DED Materials in Oil and Gas
2.5.9 Will Steels Reach Mass Productivity with Binder Jetting Technology?
2.5.9.1 Ten-year Forecast of Binder Jetting Materials in Oil and Gas
2.5.10 The Unique Case of Copper’s Ultra-low Price in Supersonic Consolidation / Cold Blown Powder Processes
2.5.10.1 Ten-year Forecast of Blown Metal Powder Materials in Oil and Gas
2.6 Polymer and Composite Materials for Oil and Gas AM
2.6.1 Key Polymer Material Suppliers for Oil and Gas Applications
2.6.2 Ten-year Forecast for All Polymer Materials in Oil and Gas AM
2.6.3 Trends for Metal Replacement Materials in Filament Extrusion Technologies
2.6.3.1 Ten-year Forecast of Thermoplastic Filaments for Oil and Gas AM Applications
2.6.4 Large-scale Oil and Gas Applications Now Accessible via Composite Pellet Extrusion
2.6.4.1 Ten-year Forecast for Composite Pellet in Material Extrusion for Oil and Gas Applications
2.6.5 Four Opportunities for Photopolymers in Oil and Gas AM
2.6.5.1 Ten-year Forecast of Resin Materials for Photopolymerization Processes in Oil and Gas
2.6.6 Advanced Materials for Polymer Powder Bed Fusion Could Open Doors to Higher Productivity of Oil and Gas Parts
2.6.6.1 Ten-year Forecast of Thermoplastic Powder Materials in Oil and Gas
2.7 The Large and Still Largely Unexploited Potential of Ceramic Materials in Oil and Gas AM
2.7.1 Ceramics AM Technologies Fit for Oil and Gas Adoption
2.7.2 Direct Production and 3D-printed Casts
2.7.3 Advanced Ceramics for Oil and Gas Applications
2.7.3.1 Ten-year Forecast of Ceramic Materials in Oil and Gas
2.8 Key Points from This Chapter

Chapter Three: Servicing the Oil and Gas Industry with AM Parts

3.1 Analysis of Typical AM Parts for Oil and Gas
3.1.1 Advanced Prototyping and Modelling
3.1.2 Molds, Cast Patters, Jigs and Fixtures
3.1.3 Drill Bits and Drill Components
3.1.4 Sensors and Associated Housings in Oil and Gas Components
3.1.5 Combustion Systems and Turbomachinery
3.1.6 Valve Fittings and Pump Components
3.1.7 Heat Exchangers in Natural Gas Compression Systems
3.1.8 Components for Gas Processing and Refinery Operations
3.1.9 Catalytic Reactors and Components
3.1.10 Downhole Applications and Complex Hydraulic Manifolds
3.1.11 Crane Hooks, Propellers and Other Large Parts
3.2 Overview of the AM Product and Process Lifecycle
3.3 The Role of Design Optimization in AM
3.3.1 Basics of DfAM (Design for Additive Manufacturing)
3.3.2 Part Design and 3D CAD File Generation Software
3.4 AM Parts Demand in Oil and Gas
3.4.1 Application Cases for Prototypes and Models
3.4.2 Application Cases for Part Replacement and Final Parts
3.4.2.1 Accelerating Adoption Through Supplier Partnerships
3.4.2.2 Evident Benefits of On-Demand Part Replacement and Application Cases
3.5 Ten-year Forecast for 3D Printed Parts in the Oil and Gas Industry
3.6.1 Ten-year Forecast for 3D Printed Metal Parts in Oil and Gas
3.6.1.1 Metal Prototypes Rising to a Plateau
3.6.1.2 Metal 3D Printed Tools and Casts for Indirect Production, a Transitory Opportunity
3.6.1.3 Metal 3D Printed Replacement Parts Are a Key Opportunity for Medium and Long Term
3.6.1.4 The Long-term Opportunity for Distributed, On-demand Mass Production of Optimized Parts by Additive Manufacturing
3.6.2 Ten-year Forecast for 3D Printed Polymer Parts in Oil and Gas
3.6.2.1 Prototypes and Models, Two Faces of the Same Application for Polymer AM Technologies
3.6.2.2 Polymer 3D Printed Tools and Casts for Indirect Production
3.6.2.3 End-use Polymer 3D Printed Parts Highly Dependent on High Performance Material Availability and Price
3.7 Key Points from This Chapter

Chapter Four: OEC Companies and AM Services Profiles in the Oil and Gas Supply Chain

4.1 Recent Activity in AM by OEC Firms
4.1.1 Saudi Aramco
4.1.2 Sinopec Group
4.1.3 China National Petroleum Corporation
4.1.4 Royal Dutch Shell
4.1.5 BP
4.1.6 Total
4.2 Recent Activity in AM by Key Oil and Gas Industry Suppliers and Stakeholders
4.2.1 General Electric
4.2.2 Siemens
4.2.3 DNV GL
4.2.4 Lloyd’s Register
4.2.5 Recent AM Activities by Other Relevant Oil and Gas Suppliers and Stakeholders
4.2.5.1 voestalpine Oil and Gas
4.2.5.2 Repsol
4.2.5.3 Woodside
4.2.5.4 Wilhelmsen and Ivaldi Group
4.2.5.5 Kennametal
4.2.5.6 Aidro
4.2.5.7 Wartsila
4.2.5.8 Equinor
4.2.5.9 Trelleborg
4.3 Forecast for Additive Manufacturing Service Revenues in the Oil and Gas Industry
4.3.1 Prototyping and Modeling Services for the Oil and Gas Industry
4.3.2 Additively Manufactured Tooling Services for the Oil and Gas Industry
4.3.3 Replacement, Repair and Remanufacturing 3D Printing Services for the Oil and Gas Industry
4.3.4 AM Mass Production Services for the Oil and Gas Industry
4.4 Key Points from This Chapter

About SmarTech Analysis
About the Analyst
Acronyms and Abbreviations Used In this Report

List of Exhibits

Exhibit 1-1: Using AM to Address Oil and Gas’ Biggest Challenges
Exhibit 1-2: SmarTech Analysis’s Additive Manufacturing Adoption Model for Oil and Gas Markets
Exhibit 1-3: Overall AM Revenues in The Oil and Gas Market by Primary Segments 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 1-4: Ten-year forecast for AM Revenues ($USM) in Oil and Gas by Segment 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 1-5: Expected 11-year Subsegment CAGR for AM in Oil and Gas
Exhibit 2-1: AM Technologies Considered for AM Hardware Forecast in this Report
Exhibit 2-2: All AM Hardware Unit Sales and YoY Growth Rate 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-3: Estimated Average Price Variation for AM Hardware Sold into Oil and Gas Industry
Exhibit 2-4: All AM Hardware Revenues ($USM) 2018 – 2029 by AM Technology Type
Exhibit 2-5: AM Hardware Revenues ($USM) CAGR by Technology in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-6: Comparison of Metal and Polymer AM Hardware Unit Sales 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-7: Comparison of Metal and Polymer AM Hardware Revenues ($USM) 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-8: Metal AM Processes Used in Oil and Gas and System Manufacturers
Exhibit 2-9: Comparison of Metal AM Hardware Unit Sales by Technology 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-10: Comparison of Metal AM Hardware Revenues ($USM) by Technology 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-11: Primary Polymer AM Processes and System Manufacturers
Exhibit 2-12: Comparison of Polymer AM Hardware Unit Sales by Technology 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-13: Comparison of Metal AM Hardware Revenues ($USM) by Technology 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-14: Key Identified Metal AM Material Development Initiatives by Print Technology
Exhibit 2-15: Trend for AM Materials Demand in Oil and Gas by AM Technology
Exhibit 2-16: Trend for AM Materials Revenues ($US) in Oil and Gas by AM Technology 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-17: Comparison of Polymer and Metal Materials Demand in Oil and Gas
Exhibit 2-18: Comparison of Polymer and Metal Materials Revenues in Oil and Gas
Exhibit 2-19: Summary of Most Common Types of Steel Additive Manufacturing Powders and Processes
Exhibit 2-20: Demand of Metal Materials in Oil and Gas (Kg) by AM Technology
Exhibit 2-21: Metal Material Revenues in Oil and Gas ($USM) by AM Technology
Exhibit 2-22: Demand of Metal Powders (Metric Tonnes) for Powder Bed Fusion 2018 2029
Exhibit 2-23: Powder Bed Fusion Metal Powders Revenues ($USM) 2018 2029 in Oil and Gas
Exhibit 2-24: Demand of Metal Powders (Kg) for DED Processes 2018 2029
Exhibit 2-25: DED Metal Materials Revenues ($USM) 2018 2029
Exhibit 2-26: Demand of Metal Powders (Kg) for Binder Jetting 2018 2029
Exhibit 2-27: Binder Jetting Metal Powders Revenues ($US) 2018 2029
Exhibit 2-28: Demand of Supersonic Consolidation/Cold Blown Metal Powders (Metric Tonnes) 2018-2029
Exhibit 2-29: Supersonic Consolidation/Cold Blown Metal Powders Revenues ($USM) 2018-2029
Exhibit 2-30: Demand of Polymer Materials in Oil and Gas (Metric Tonnes) by AM Technology
Exhibit 2-31: All Polymer Material Revenues in Oil and Gas ($USM) by AM Technology
Exhibit 2-32: Demand of Polymer Thermoplastics (Metric Tonnes) for Filament Extrusion Processes 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-33: Thermoplastic Filament Revenues ($USM) 2018 – 2029 in Oil and Gas
Exhibit 2-34: Large Format Additive Manufacturing Systems (LFAM)
Exhibit 2-35: Demand of Thermoplastic Pellets (Kg) for Material Extrusion Processes 2018-2029
Exhibit 2-36: Thermoplastic Revenues ($US) for Material Extrusion Processes in Oil and Gas 2018-2029
Exhibit 2-37: Demand of Photopolymer Resins (Kg) for Stereolithographic and Material Jetting Processes 2018-2029
Exhibit 2-38: Photopolymer Resin Revenues ($USM) for Stereolithographic and Material Jetting Processes 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-39: Demand of Thermoplastic Powders (Kg) for PBF Processes in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-40: Thermoplastic Powders Revenues ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-41: Ceramics Demand (Kg) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 2-42: Ceramics Revenues ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-1: Typical 3D-printed Oil and Gas Parts and Relative Size and Weight
Exhibit 3-2: Typical Lifecycle for Materials/Products Produced Through Additive Manufacturing
Exhibit 3-3: Benefits of Rapid Prototyping
Exhibit 3-4: Demand Trend for 3D-printed Parts in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029 by Material
Exhibit 3-5: Revenue Trend for 3D-printed Parts in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029 by Material
Exhibit 3-6: Demand Trend of 3D-printed Parts in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029 by Part Type
Exhibit 3-7: Revenues Trend of 3D-printed Parts in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029 by Part Type
Exhibit 3-8: Expected CAGR for 3D-printed Part Sub-segments ($USM) 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-9: Number of Metal 3D-printed Parts ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-10: Value of Metal 3D-printed Parts ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-11: Number of Metal 3D-printed Prototypes in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-12: Value of Metal 3D-printed Prototypes ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-13: Number of Metal 3D-printed Tools in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-14: Value of Metal 3D-printed Tools ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-15: Number of Metal 3D-printed Replacement Parts in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-16: Value of Metal 3D-printed Replacement Parts ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-17: Number of Metal End-use Parts in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-18: Value of Metal 3D-printed End-use Parts ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-19: Number of Polymer 3D-printed Parts ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-20: Value of Polymer 3D-printed Parts ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-21: Number of Polymer 3D-printed Prototypes in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-22: Value of Polymer 3D-printed Prototypes ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-23: Number of Polymer 3D-printed Tools in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-24: Value of Polymer 3D-printed Tools ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-25: Number of 3D-printed Polymer End-use Parts in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 3-26: Value of Polymer 3D-printed End-use Parts ($USM) in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 4-1: Revenues from 3D-printed Prototype and Models Services by Supplier Type in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 4-2: Revenues from Metal 3D-printed Prototypes by Supplier Type in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 4-3: Revenues from Polymer 3D-printed Prototypes and Models by Supplier Type in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 4-4: Revenues from 3D-printed Tools by Supplier Type in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 4-5: Revenues from Metal 3D-printed Tools by Supplier Type in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 4-6: Revenues from Polymer 3D-printed Tools by Supplier Type in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 4-7: Revenues from 3D-printed Replacement Parts by Supplier Type in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 4-8: Revenues from 3D-printed End-use Parts by Supplier Type in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 4-9: Revenues from Metal 3D-printed End-use Parts by Supplier Type in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029
Exhibit 4-10: Revenues from Polymer 3D-printed End-use Parts by Supplier Type in Oil and Gas 2018 – 2029

Additive manufacturing (AM) in the oil and gas industry could have an impact unparalleled by any other industrial sectors based on complex engineering. However, only until very recently have the capabilities of additive manufacturing systems evolved to meet the oil and industry’s stringent demands in terms of reliability, productivity and size capabilities. This report builds on SmarTech Analysis ongoing research into the oil and gas sector to accurately quantify the revenue opportunity and assesses the levels AM adoption in this field, based on AM hardware, materials services and parts produced through 2029. These include short- medium- and long terms opportunities for the upstream, midstream and downstream oil and gas industry segments.

This report covers the established areas of AM in oil and gas focusing primarily on current adoption of metal AM technologies such as metal powder bed fusion (PBF) and directed energy deposition (DED) including Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) processes. These technologies are analyzed in depth, along with material demand for all supported metal alloys (today and in the future) and part production capabilities with a particular focus on the more short-term opportunity presented by on-demand spare parts.

Based on SmarTech Analysis’ unique and profound understanding of available AM technologies, materials and applications, the report then goes on to assess the overall oil and gas AM opportunity, including upcoming metal, polymer, composite and ceramic AM processes and materials that are going to gain wider adoption in the oil and gas industry during the 10-year forecast period examined. These include leading polymer technologies for prototyping, modeling, casting and final parts, as well as high-throughput metal AM technologies such as new bound metal/binder jetting and supersonic acceleration/cold blown powder processes.

We also profile some of the leading oil and gas AM service providers, highlighting unique trends in the oil and gas market that see specialized and trusted tier 1 and tier 2 (and tier 3) suppliers (including some AM service providers) become the primary adopters of AM to provide services to the largest oil companies. Within this scenario, SmarTech Analysis expects widespread AM adoption in the oil and gas industry to be driven by hardware sales rather than by AM service providers as in other industrial segments.

For each AM segment (hardware, materials, parts and services), the ten-year forecasts contained in this report further break out the market by specific hardware technology, material type and support (metal and polymer powders, polymer and composite filaments and pellets, photopolymer resins and metal wire), part types (prototypes, tools, replacement parts and mass produced final parts) and service type (tier 1, tier 2 suppliers). Both revenue ($ Millions) and volume (units or kilograms/tonnes shipped) are considered in the forecasts.